Are You a National or a Global Citizen?

Global Village

A recent poll looked at the opinions of 20,000 people in 18 countries around the world regarding self-perceptions of citizenship. It showed that a significant amount of people – more than half – agreed that they consider themselves as “global citizens” more than a citizen of their own nationality.

As the World Economic Forum mentions, “The big increase of this sentiment is being driven largely by emerging economies, such as Nigeria (73% feel they are global citizens), China (71%), Peru (70%), and India (67%).” The poll also shows that ever since 2009, following the global economic crisis, industrialized nations are less likely to agree.

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It’s Harder for Religious People to Tell Fact from Fiction

Jesus-Krishna

When I wrote the article “Should Parents Tell Their Kids ‘The Truth’ About Santa?” three and a half years ago, I argued that most children whose parents allow them to believe are giving them a potentially important opportunity to learn. That is, to understand the process of believing something they inevitably stop believing in (or should I say, most people stop believing in). However, I stumbled upon some research that both reminded me of this story and made me wonder about it.

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Disruptive Technology and Corporate Karate

disruptive tech banner

“Disruptive technology” – a term I dislike, coined by Harvard professor Clayton Christensen in 1995 – refers to an innovation that is generally meant to provide more financially accessible alternatives to well-established products, in order to gain market share. As Christensen and his colleagues explain, disruption “describes a process whereby a smaller company with fewer resources is able to successfully challenge established incumbent businesses.” This post will describe not only what kinds of effects disruptive technology can have on incumbents, but how corporations may be able to demonstrate a bit of self-defence when such innovations threaten them.

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Corporate Governance, and the Stakeholder vs. Shareholder Model

Corp Gov

Corporate governance is not a term that comes up in everyday conversation, but it is a very informative concept to know. Corporate governance refers to how a corporation is governed. This entails who owns and controls the company, and how it is managed. There are two main models of corporate governance, the shareholder model (which prioritizes the return on investment for a large number of investors) and the stakeholder model (where fewer people own, but more people have a stake in, the company; including customers, competitors, and the external community). These models of corporate governance define capital (finances), labour (employees), and management (employers) in very different ways. These relationships will be explained in the national contexts of the US and Germany below.

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Understanding Labour Market Flexibility Should Matter to You

You're fired, clean out your desk office worker

If you’re someone who wants to work to support yourself (i.e. basically everyone), then the labour market is important for you to understand. Just like the “supply and demand” of products in a market, the supply and demand of labour makes up what we call the “labour market.” An employee therefore represents a supply, to be “bought” (by an employer) and “sold” (by an employee). Depending on several volatile factors, there may be more or less demand from employers, and the government may play a significant role in affecting this. However… which approach is the best for workers?

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The Evolution of Leadership

Businessman on summit

“So he shepherded them according to the integrity of his heart,

And guided them with his skillful hands.”

–Psalm 78:72

Leaders have surfaced in stories and historical records since the invention of writing. No matter what period, mankind has had leaders, from the bible to the oval office, from Alexander the Great to Mahatma Gandhi. However, the way we have thought of leadership has greatly changed over the past century. In business and academia, it has been a subject of much theorization. and that is exactly what this article is all about. This article is not intended to be comprehensive, but accessible. It is therefore grossly oversimplified, which means it as a brief and useful primer to the research literature.

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The Easiest and Hardest Languages to Learn

Crazy long name of lake on sign

Some languages you can get the hang of, some languages are pretty tough, and some languages are downright difficult. …And then there are those special few, those ridiculously complex ones, that take so long to master, that you’re pretty much hopeless to master it unless you started at a very early age, or moved to the place in which that language was spoken. Let’s look at the hardest languages to learn.

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Best Business Schools Everywhere in the World (2015-2016)

Graduates in Cap and Gown --- Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

There are lots of sites that have this information, but they require that you click through 25 times to get the information you want. I solved that problem. This article is not about a ranking. It is a list of schools that should be on your radar if you are looking at business schools anywhere in the world.

It shows the best business schools in the world – not the best overall universities. Of course, there is some overlap; but keep in mind that many of these business schools are not even part of a university.

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What Really Happened to Phineas Gage? – Psychology’s Most Famous Case Study

Phineas Gage close-up

If you have ever studied psychology, you probably know the name “Phineas Gage.” He was an American railway worker whose life changed dramatically on September 13, 1848. He was removing rocks so a railway to be laid, which sometimes requires drilling holes into the big boulders that can’t be pushed aside, and pushing in gun powder with an iron rod before exploding them from a safe distance. That day, however, he accidentally scraped the boulder which ignited the gun powder, projecting the rod into the air. It went straight through his head… but he lived. His legacy lives on as psychology’s most famous case study; but his legend is usually distorted in myth.

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Top 30 Countries for Paid Leave & Holidays

Out of office – vacation at sea

Sometimes you can’t wait to get off the laptop and just head to the beach. When it comes to paid leave, however, some countries just have it better than others. I was interested in looking at which countries have the highest amount of paid leave, and which are not so lucky.

Only major countries were used for this comparison. Though there was some conflicting information, I mostly used data from the Center for Economic and Policy Research and the International Labour Organization. The numbers below represent the total number of paid leave days (followed by the breakdown of paid vacation days, and paid public holidays, in parentheses like this).

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