Tag Archives: skepticism

The REAL Story Behind the Quote “There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute”

“There’s a sucker born every minute” – P.T. Barnum’s most famous words. He is widely considered to be one of the best purveyors of entertainment in history – a genius in sales and marketing – and these words have become somewhat of a legacy. But did he ever really say them? As it turns out, we may be suckers for believing this after all.

Posted in Biographical, Skepticism | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Scientific Consensus and the Obvious Truth about Global Climate Change

You-control-climate-changeI often ask questions in my article titles, but the question “are we responsible for climate change?” is simply unnecessary. From the overwhelming evidence, we know the answer to this question; and the answer is “YES!” This is good news because we may have the power to change things, but bad news because we aren’t doing nearly enough, and we may pass the point of no return within the next few decades. Furthermore, with so many people fighting to argue against what almost all climatologists are saying, most people aren’t even trying to do something about it.

Posted in Biology & Evolution, Culture, Media, Psychology, Science, Skepticism, Social Psych, Technology | Tagged , , , , , | 18 Comments

Exorcism, the Human Stun Gun, and Suggestion

Pope Exorcism

When the world ended last year, I pointed out the there is a certain degree of relativism to the apocalypse. That is, you, the reader, must have been impervious to the apocalypse. Why? It’s simple – you never believed it. And therefore, it didn’t happen. Unfortunately, many people do believe in things for which there is no evidence, including the end of the world. In the Vatican City, new Pope Francis has nothing to say about the end of the world, but he may have just performed his first exorcism as Pope, which is yet another phenomenon for which there is no evidence. And it reminds me of the “Human Stun Gun.”

Posted in Abnormal & Clinical Psych, Biographical, Culture, Japan, Psychology, Science, Skepticism | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Skeptikai Notices (Sep1) – Medicine, sex, memory, and skepticism

Medicine:

Half of GPs back change in rules on sex with patients – Is it okay for a doctor to have consensual sex with a patient? What if the doctor sends the patient to another practitioner? One survey specifically asked this to 282 general practitioners in the UK and found that “48% would support a GP’s decision to enter into a sexual relationship with a patient, as long as they registered with another practice.” 28% were against such a decision, and 24% were not sure, but the takeaway is that half of them were okay with it. So this raises the question… which one of the doctors above do you think is okay with it?

Posted in Aggregators/lists/rankings | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Einstein on God

I’m tired of hearing people cherry-pick quotes from intelligent historical figures to make their points, especially this one Albert Einstein said about god: “Science without religion is lame. Religion without science is blind.” I imagine if Einstein was alive today, he may have regretted making that statement, considering how often it has been used to support proponents of “faith” – which Einstein would never subscribe to. Einstein was a man of science, and lived his life like a true skeptic. He allowed evidence to influence his opinion, which is how science should always be conducted. The unfortunate thing about Einstein’s legacy of brilliant quotes is that they are sometimes ambiguous, as the most poetic of statements often are (which is part of the reason they’re remembered so long afterwards). This post is intended to be a reference for whenever I see someone erroneously making a statement about Einstein’s quotes on God and religion.

Posted in Biographical, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Rock Star Skepticism

If you thought there was no skepticism in the Japanese rock scene, you would be wrong.

Most people reading this (i.e., English speakers) are probably unaware of just how much music Japan produces. Japan has a rich musical history and distinct cultural sound, not to mention the second biggest music market in the world, right after America. I find that some Japanese bands are able to tap into the sounds of their American counterparts, but not really vice-versa. Regardless, I’m not here to review music. I’m here to introduce you to the award-winning Japanese rock band “Radwimps.” Their music is not only fantastic, but their lyrics are always meaningful and fascinating. My favourite Radwimps song did what so relatively few have done in Japanese history (or mainstream music history in general): They dissed God.

Posted in Activism, Culture, Japan, Skepticism | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments