Tag Archives: japanese law

In Tokyo, Dancing is a Crime

dancing-wallpaperPolice raids on clubs in Tokyo have been gradually increasing in recent years. This isn’t particularly abnormal, because in virtually every country in the world, clubs often close down (and often open later under a different name) for certain things like unfortunate violence or other illicit activities within such establishments. However, the illicit activities that are most commonly the subject of police crackdowns is something that the dance clubs probably were not expecting – dancing.

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The Whole Story on Japan’s 99% Conviction Rate, and the Corruption that Follows

handcuffs red bg

The conviction rate in Japan is unbelievable. Some reports say 99.8%, others say 99.97%; but it’s clear that it’s above 99%. Why is this so? Are Japanese police really so perfect that they almost always arrest the real criminals and always have the evidence to prove their cases? Don’t bet on it. The Japanese legal system is corrupt, and the effects of this broken system can be felt by anyone in Japan who has ever been detained, regardless of innocence.

Confessing for Nothing

This excerpt from The Economist sums up the problem:

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Is Japan About to Become an Offensive Military Power?

Japanese Army picture

“Aspiring sincerely to an international peace based on justice and order, the Japanese people forever renounce war as a sovereign right of the nation and the threat or use of force as a means of settling international disputes.

In order to accomplish the aim of the preceding paragraph, land, sea and air forces, as well as other war potential, will never be maintained. The right of belligerency of the state will not be recognized.” -Article 9; Constitution of Japan

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That’s Just the Way it Goes

handcuffs

Japan being traditional (in terms of its legal system), and sticking to its guns can be seen as a double-edged sword. It’s nice to see consistency, and enforcing the notion that no one is above the law, but is it going too far? Recently, after arriving at the Narita International airport, English comic actor Russell Brand was deported from Japan due to his criminal record from over a decade prior. This shouldn’t be too much of a surprise, though. He was not the first celebrity to be unceremoniously expelled from Japan.

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