SATIRAN – Part 2: Ahmadinejad, Israel, and the Presidency

In Part 1, the recent health issues of Ahmadinejad were discussed, showing a man more human that people give credit for. But the timing was unfortunate. Ahmadinejad’s collapse was during a political time in which the public perception of his strength as a leader is rumoured to be at risk. For example, his recent attempts at improving his image through Iranians’ love of sports have been failing due to international sanctions that make it difficult for players to continue playing. Now, the president is finding new obstacles from all strata of society.

First and foremost on Ahmadinejad’s mind is to try to visit his friend – a former aide – in prison, which has been a surprising struggle. The Guardian newspaper reports that the mere fact that the aide was arrested was in and of itself somewhat indicative of Ahmadinejad’s current political authority:

[The aide] was arrested in late September while Ahmadinejad was addressing the UN general assembly in New York, a sign that the president’s influence over Iranian politics is dwindling.

Ahmadinejad has asked the judiciary for permission to visit, but so far the request has been denied. According to Radio Zamaneh, the judiciary said that the president “has never made such a request in all his years in office, and to allow a visit when his press aide is serving a sentence would be inappropriate.”

But after the death of Sattar Beheshti – an Iranian blogger whose writings criticized the Iranian establishment – just five days after his arrest, things changed. That was two weeks ago. Now, one official interviewed by the Khorsheed daily said “About a month ago, the president issued a letter describing his intention to visit Evin Prison but he was accused of political duplicity… But today we see the wisdom of his decision to inspect the prisons.”

Unfortunately, not everyone has seen the light yet, which is why Ahmadinejad and his followers have been trying to rally support. The president merely wants to ensure the safety of his prisoners. Some people have come up with conspiracy theories based on the fact that over forty prisoners witnessed marks of torture all over Beheshit’s body during his brief tenure in prison; but considering they’re criminals, their word is not exactly worth much. Instead, we should rely on the law-abiding work of experts who only acknowledged five bruises on his corpse, arguing that he died of natural causes. It was only coincidental that the otherwise healthy, middle-aged blogger died a few days after incarceration.

[December 1 Update: Tehran’s cyber police chief has just been sacked for negligence in letting what is being reported as being tortured to death to happen.]

But despite Ahmadinejad’s wishes to ensure prisoner safety, one of the individuals who has not allowed him to visit the prison is none other than the surpeme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. While the earnest president was hoping to convince his leader by citing that barring him from the prison is a violation of the constitution, Khamenei seems unable to pay attention to such matters.

He is, after all, preoccupied with his most recent campaign against the US and Israel – this time for initiating the ongoing Syrian civil war. It wouldn’t be the first time Israel had tried to cause instability in their enemy’s terrorities. Just last month, there was a car-bomb in Lebanon which Iran quickly understood was Israel’s. Whenever an attack of this nature – i.e., no evidence of accountability – happens to one of Iran’s allies, it is undoubtedly the work of the Zionist regime. They’re so clever that they don’t leave a trace of evidence, but not clever enough to outsmart the Iranian leaders who know the mark of an Israeli when they see it – even when it’s not there.

So never mind that Syria’s is a civil war with a dictatorship spanning over four decades; there’s no denying that the US and Israel are behind it. BigStory reports:

In his message to Muslims performing the annual hajj pilgrimage to Mecca, he charges that the civil war, which he characterized as “young Muslims killing each other,” is a “crime initiated by the United States and the Zionist regime, Israel.”

Therefore, Ahmadinejad has been reduced to writing letters to Khamenei, saying “You have twice insisted that inspecting Evin prison is not in the best interests of the country and you have said that you disapprove of it. But the constitution does not require any permission or approval from the judiciary for the president in administering his legal duties.”

Since then, he has said that he would visit the prison, despite being ordered not to. By being such a maverick, he hopes to retain the public’s perception of strength. Being strong, he has said, is not only caused by Iran’s rich history of technological and scientific sophistication (i.e., arabic numerals) and his own personal leadership, but because God is protecting them. And when you have the strength of the creator on your side, you can’t help but feel it.

It is with this sentiment that Iranian Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi declared the recent unmanned drone mission into Israel a resounding success. It flew 55 kilometers (25 miles) into Israel, before being shot down by the Israeli Defence Force. Iran had supplied Lebanon’s Hezbollah group – which the Western media often refer to as a terrorist group – with the materials for the drone, but Vahidi proudly stated that the drone didn’t even have their latest technology. In short, this Iranian-made Hezbollah-launched drone was a clear victory for the peace-seeking Iranian president, by exposing the weaknesses in Israeli air defence.

But there is still room for Ahmadinejad to increase the public perception of his strength. This is why he is still vehemently insisting that the controversial “Innocence of Muslims” video – a video which ends with a phone call saying “seven days,” inducing violence at US, German, and English embassies all over the world – was the work of Jews, and Americans. Especially Jewish Americans.

So the video was naturally declared to be a Jewish plot to divide Muslims and initiate conflict. This was even true after the facts showed otherwise, which is good because Ahmadinejad’s confidence makes him look all the more powerful. Just like his supporting Fars agency kept their consistencyeven after admitting being wrong (see Part 1), Ahmadinejad didn’t let the talented Jewish filmmaker “Sam Bacile” off the hook when he found out that Bacile was actually just a pseudonym for “Nakoula Basseley” – who was neither Jewish nor talented. Basseley was in fact an Egyptian-born Coptic Christian who moved to California, but his initial lies about his name, origin, and the notion that he spent $5 million on producing the movie went ignored. Facts have historically been known to be a part  of the Jewish propaganda machine anyways.

So instead, reputable sources like pro-Palestinian bloggers are hard at work trying to piece together the truth, by failing to acknowledge that two people they’re talking about is actually the same person:

I wonder why Netanyahu has not blamed Iran for the murder of Ameican ambassador in Libya? However, the Zionist-controlled mainstream media is covering Jewish-Israeli Sam Bacile by blaming California Coptic Christian Nakoula Basseley Nakoula for producing the anti-Islam movie ‘Innocence of Muslims’.

Regardless of the semantics, the Egyptian-born filmmaker has been imprisoned (not for the video) and so will probably be out of the news for a while. But Ahmadinejad’s position on the video has gained him much support in the region. Similarly, his insistance on Iran’s nuclear program only being used for peaceful purposes is becoming more popular with the public.

Despite saying that Israel should be “eliminated from the pages of history,” a peaceful country like Iran would never cross that line of producing nuclear arms. We know this to be fact for a few reasons. First, because Ahmadinejad said in September “The Iranian nation is not seeking an atomic bomb, nor do they need to build an atomic bomb.” And if that didn’t settle it, then his observation that the “period and era of using nuclear weapons is over” should. But he also said that nations who are using nuclear weapons are “politically backward” and “mentally retarded.”

So as you can see, he neither needs nor wants a nuclear weapon, which is all the more convenient because he’s definitely not building one. He’s just trying to run a country and bring peace to the Middle East. And unlike the US, he’s going to do it without spending billions of dollars on elections, commenting that elections are “battleground for the capitalists and an excuse for hasty spending.” Heck… he’s not even going to have elections! Just having Iranians go through the motions is enough to boost public morale and make them feel special. Why, that’s all he needed in 2009 when he won the election everywhere in Iran, despite being less popular in places like his opponent’s hometown. After all, Iranian don’t need democracy; they just need to feel like they’re being democratic.

And yet, despite his attempts to govern a peaceful and prosperous country, there are still people who want his presidency to end. Last month, Iranian cameraman Hassan Golkhanban defected from his UN entourage after taking secret footage of Iran’s nuclear facilities. Some people think that this footage will be instrumental in keeping Ahmadinejad accountable, but nothing yet has come from these videos, aside from the fact that Golkhanban is now being hidden, most likely by the CIA.

It’s just not fair that despite all his efforts, President Ahmadinejad continues to be misunderstood, misinterpreted, and even mistranslated. He is simply a man of God, and a man of peace. If only the enemies he vowed to kill would see it that way, the world would be a much happier place.

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2 Responses to SATIRAN – Part 2: Ahmadinejad, Israel, and the Presidency

  1. Andrew says:

    🙂 Great article, I wonder if any Middle-Eastern media company will use this as proof of Japan’s support for President Ahmadinejad…

  2. Helena says:

    The LA Times piece focuses on sanntiocs, not military action, and the WSJ piece provides a long list of practical difficulties in carrying out a military attack, not least that it would be impossible for Israel’s military to uproot a program widely dispersed in a country the size of Iran.As for the US, given the (lamentable) lack of will amongst too many American politicians to properly resource the fight against the Taliban, what appetite do they really have for armed conflict with a much more formidable foe like Iran?Missing from the WSJ piece is what Iran might do the day after an attack. The opportunities for revenge would be many.

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